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mother, daughter

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sister and seeker

Snake and an apple

A little after word to my third chosen picture.

No surprise, I’ve still been reading the all time classics of literature, and my mind still circles mostly around the religious art based on it. It really doesn’t help the topic of our art history studies are all about Christian art.

In Mucha’s take of the Morning Star I really like the depiction of a Venus as a morning star, especially when I connect the whole “fall from grace” of Lucifer and his free will to the apple which symbols the same choice, and to me, freedom and base of human nature. The urge to reach for an apple, the act commit by a female, is the ultimate act of courage, and I never view Eve’s fall in negative light, but as a positive act of stepping up to make her own mind.

Remember that you and I made this journey, that we went together to a place where there was nowhere left to go.

—Jhumpa Lahiri, The Namesake (via bookmania)

Akseli Gallen-Kallela (Axel Gallén), Ad Astra.

Akseli Gallen-Kallela (Axel Gallén), Ad Astra.

The feeling when you have finally completed a smart scribble about Mesopotamian art, click open a page to read over and relax, brew some coffee and kid comes in; “hey mom, I’m not napping anymore!”

Paradise Lost, quotes


Abashed the devil stood and felt how awful goodness is and saw Virtue in her shape how lovely: and pined his loss”

Whereto with speedy words th’ Arch-Fiend replied.
“Fall’n Cherub, to be weak is miserable
Doing or Suffering: but of this be sure,
To do ought good never will be our task,
But ever to do ill our sole delight,”


The mind is its own place, and in itself can make a heaven of hell, a hell of heaven..”


The first sort by their own suggestion fell, Self-tempted, self-deprav’d: Man falls deceiv’d”

Paradise Lost

Now, late to the reason as of why I first came to think of Gustave Doré’s illustrations. I’ve been a huge poetry nerd since I learned to read, and Doré has made most fabulous work illustrating the classic poetry, as well the story-time books. 

When I first began to dig to the mythology and especially the darker themes of it I, of course, came across John Milton’s "Paradise Lost". The plummeting fallen angel, Lucifer, the Morningstar, has fascinated human mind as long as the story has been told and it touched myself as well. After reading and checking out the thematic art for it I found Doré’s art wrapped all around OTHER epic poems, such as Dante’s “The Divine Comedy”.

Long story short, my recurring addiction is to read over a tome filled with Doré’s art, accompanied with the respective examples of the tales and poems they base on. Next I’ll give you a few of my favorite quotes from the Paradise Lost

waywardism:

dean&castiel | little lion man [8.01+2 spoilers]

1. Gustave Doré, “Paradise Lost”.

1. Gustave Doré, “Paradise Lost”.